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Hollywood released plenty of sports films over the decades but few managed to score an Oscar.  Since 1929 when the annual prize gala debuted, 89 Best Picture awards were handed out and only three went to movies in the sports genre- more
A decade before they were reincarnated into the Wizards, the Washington Bullets drafted the two tallest and shortest players in NBA history and paired them for a season- other than providing for a colorful sideshow, the synergies failed to raise the team's octane.  more
An ear-piercing, speed-thrilling, stock car pursuit is the most lucrative spectator sport in America, taking in $3 Billion a year in corporate sponsorships, more than double that of the NFL.  The sport's  premier governing body... more
Officially called the “AFL-NFL World Championship Game”, the first Super Bowl was less super and more scrimmage.  more
A remote South Pacific island with a sheep population four times greater than humans has produced the world's most successful rugby union squads for over a century.  more
From sports, to fashion, to collectibles- the athletic shoe has seen it all.  Today’s subculture craze for celebrity sneakers has spawned a lucrative reseller market below the radar of  most older adults.  more
The NHL turns 100 this year but as we are often reminded, tradition doesn’t come easy in a world driven by dollars and cents.  Of the 122 teams comprising the four majors- NHL, NFL, NBA, MLB- only 12 original franchises have survived... more
Basketball’s long-range shooting stars owe their celebrity status to a sports team entrepreneur they never met and a defunct league they never played in.  Though the three-point shot was adopted by the NBA in 1979, it was first introduced in 1961... more
Street gangster, prize fighter and war hero, Barney Ross’ greater than life story was unmatched inside and outside the ring.  Born Dov-Ber Rosofsky in 1909, his dreams of becoming a Talmudic scholar were shattered when his father... more
Today’s scantily-clad cheerleading beauties started off as college boys howling into megaphones trying to galvanize school spirit at football games.  The first known school chant originated in the 1880’s by a pep squad at... more
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THIS WEEK

10 years ago

BASEBALL April 2, 2010  Former MLB pitcher Mike Cuellar dies at the age of 72. A 2x World Series champion and 4x All-Star, Cuellar started off with the Cincinnati Reds in 1959 and played for 5 teams, spending the most years with the Baltimore Orioles. He won the AL Cy Young award in his first season with the dynastic Orioles and was their starting pitcher at the 1969 World Series against the NY Mets. Cuellar closed his career with an ERA of 3.14 and 1,632 strikeouts.

20 years ago

BASKETBALL April 2, 2000  At the 19th Women’s NCAA Basketball Championship, the Connecticut Huskies defeat the Tennessee Volunteers 71-52. Led by their famed coach Geno Auriemma, the Huskies claimed their second national title. They would win another 9 championships and become the nation’s most successful women’s basketball program to date. The Connecticut ladies dispatched Penn State at the Semi-finals before taking on Tennessee for the crown.

30 years ago

GOLF April 8, 1990  Nick Faldo wins the 54th annual Masters Tournament held in Augusta, Georgia. Shooting a 278 (-10) and tying Raymond Floyd in the final round after the latter bogeyed on the 16th hole, Faldo emerged victorious in the playoff showdown. It was his second consecutive win at the Masters and third of what would be six career majors. Born in Herdforshire, England, Faldo turned pro in 1976 and has won more majors than any other modern European golfer.

40 years ago

OLYMPICS April 12, 1980 The U.S. Olympic committee announces their boycott of the 1980 Moscow Olympics. A total of 66 countries chose not to attend the games due to the Soviet Union’s invasion of Afghanistan. Nevertheless, 80 other nations did agree to send their athletes to the first Olympics that were held in a communist country. Four years later, the Russians and their East European allies would follow-up with a boycott of the Los Angeles games.