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The bygone Soviet era of the 1950’s & 60’s produced the most successful Olympian in modern history, that is until Michael Phelps touched the swimming pool wall at the 2012 London games to win his 19th medal.  more
1980's and 90's Colombia was ravaged by an endless cycle of narco-violence, yet in the midst of this deadly scourge soccer thrived and enjoyed a golden era.  The unlikely catalyst- laundered drug money that... more
The late communist dictator who threw political curve balls on the world stage for 50 years mixed baseball and revolution like a mojito cocktail.  Historically, baseball was ingrained into the Cuban soul like music, rum and  tropical breezes.  more
46 years ago this month, the deadliest aviation accident in U.S. sporting history wiped out the entire Marshall University football team.  Thirty seven players and 9 members of the coaching staff were killed on their way back...  more
Great athleticism can be seen as a form of art, but can art itself be regarded as a sporting event ?  Maybe not with strength and endurance, but with style and beauty.  Between 1912 and 1948 seven Olympiads incorporated art...  more
The connection between U.S. Presidents and football goes back to the early years of the 20th Century.  In 1904, the ruffian and violent sport of the day saw 18 deaths, spurring calls for a ban on the game.  more
A shoe-less African running through the streets of Rome resembled a scene closer to the time of slaves and gladiators   than  the modern,  espresso-sipping day of Italy.  But spectators who lined up to watch the marathon race... more
The oldest of the four Major golf championships goes back to 1860, but it wasn't until after WWI that American golfers would make their mark on the British isles.  In 1921, "Golf Illustrated" magazine helped raise a fund  to...  more
World War II was raging and as America's resources were being diverted overseas, baseball's greatest assets   were no exception. Celebrated sluggers like  Joe DiMaggio, Ted Williams and Hank Greenberg  were just...  more
The country that invented, codified and spread the most popular sport  in the world surprisingly has only one World Cup victory. The year was 1966 and John Lennon infamously proclaimed that the Beatles have now become... more
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THIS WEEK

10 years ago

BASEBALL April 2, 2010  Former MLB pitcher Mike Cuellar dies at the age of 72. A 2x World Series champion and 4x All-Star, Cuellar started off with the Cincinnati Reds in 1959 and played for 5 teams, spending the most years with the Baltimore Orioles. He won the AL Cy Young award in his first season with the dynastic Orioles and was their starting pitcher at the 1969 World Series against the NY Mets. Cuellar closed his career with an ERA of 3.14 and 1,632 strikeouts.

20 years ago

BASKETBALL April 2, 2000  At the 19th Women’s NCAA Basketball Championship, the Connecticut Huskies defeat the Tennessee Volunteers 71-52. Led by their famed coach Geno Auriemma, the Huskies claimed their second national title. They would win another 9 championships and become the nation’s most successful women’s basketball program to date. The Connecticut ladies dispatched Penn State at the Semi-finals before taking on Tennessee for the crown.

30 years ago

GOLF April 8, 1990  Nick Faldo wins the 54th annual Masters Tournament held in Augusta, Georgia. Shooting a 278 (-10) and tying Raymond Floyd in the final round after the latter bogeyed on the 16th hole, Faldo emerged victorious in the playoff showdown. It was his second consecutive win at the Masters and third of what would be six career majors. Born in Herdforshire, England, Faldo turned pro in 1976 and has won more majors than any other modern European golfer.

40 years ago

OLYMPICS April 12, 1980 The U.S. Olympic committee announces their boycott of the 1980 Moscow Olympics. A total of 66 countries chose not to attend the games due to the Soviet Union’s invasion of Afghanistan. Nevertheless, 80 other nations did agree to send their athletes to the first Olympics that were held in a communist country. Four years later, the Russians and their East European allies would follow-up with a boycott of the Los Angeles games.